Posted On: March 23, 2012 by Stephen Bilkis

Secondary brain injury is what occurs after the damage caused by the initial impact to the skull

Secondary brain injury is what occurs after the damage caused by the initial impact to the skull, according to doctors. Medical professionals classify it into two types: extracranial and intracranial.

Extracranial secondary brain damage cause problems either by restricting the flow of oxygen to the brain or restricting the flow of blood. Both of these conditions can eventually cause the death of brain cells. This can be extremely dangerous, especially if undetected for a time.
The most extreme consequence of oxygen deprivation is the persistent vegetative state (PVS) or death. Secondary brain damage due to lack of oxygen or low blood pressure can even occure to those who have already been admitted to intensive care units, according to studiess. Some studies have shown this can occur in about a third of patients, even when such an injury was not detected earlier.

Intracranial secondary brain damage needs to be taken care of as soon as it is discovered. Bruises, bleeding, and swelling on the inside of the skull can rapidly lead to other problems, sources have learned. Often, such developments can be prevented, however. So-called neuroprotective strategies can not only be pharmaceutical, but organizational, as well, meaning that a medical staff that is well-trained can go a long way toward making a head injury that might be fatal or permanently damaging into something that can be managed, treated, and possibly even fully cured. Early diagnosis which is practiced in hospitals in Suffolk and Westchester counties and treatment of brain injury will always be the most effect strategy when it comes to dealing with brain injury.