Articles Posted in Skull Fracture

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The symptoms of bTBI (explosive blast traumatic brain injury) can actually be very subtle, doctors tell patients. Sometimes, there is no outward sign of injury until certain symptoms begin to arise, like headaches, vertigo, or short-term memory loss. Because of this, victims of bTBI should be evaluated by a physician or psychologist to determine how extensive their injuries might be, if any. Neurophysical evaluation should be a part of this examination. There are currently efforts to create neuropsychological tests that can be automated on laptop computer or are easy enough to be used to by first responders who may have less training. Skull fracture can be uncovered and treated.

Patient who may have PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) should see a combat stress team provider or a psychiatrist as soon as possible. It is very important to remember, expertss have in Manhattan and Long Island hospitals have learned, that bTBI and PTSD can have very similar symptoms and may occur alone or together in a patient. It may be difficult to tell them apart.

When TBI may be present in a patient, that person should be excused from all combat-related duties. The patient should be put on light duty until the symptoms are gone or until he or she is moved to a place where advanced neuroimaging, like MRI, may be used, and a more detailed evaluation can be used. Doctors have determined that it is vital for a patient suffering brain injury, or who may be suffering from it, to be treated with the utmost care, so the condition does not become worse.

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Sometimes the extent of moderate or severe damage caused by bTBI (explosive blast traumatic brain injury)is difficult to determine at first, doctors have told specialists. Severe facial trauma can prevent reliable neurological examination, especially when it comes to examining the pupils for reaction. Specialized tools are often necessary to even make triage decisions that could save lives.

The chaos of war only compounds the difficulty in making decisions when it comes to severe injury. When a doctor or other medical professional is used to medical centers in the United States, where there are adequate resources and help in the form of other professionals near at hand, it can be very difficult to work on a battlefield where everything is in short supply, but the number of patients is much greater.

Difficult decisions have to be made in such environments, experts have learned. It isn’t uncommon for a great number of severely injured patients to arrive at the same time. Efficient triage is essential for the best use of limited resources. There may be few health care providers, no operating rooms or CT scanners, and not many blood products to go around. It may even be impossible to evacuate patients to a better facility. The whole idea behind triage is take resources that may not be adequate and stretch them out to their best possible use to help the largest number of patients. They must be stabilized and their lives preserved until they can be evacuated into a better circumstance.

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Secondary brain injury is what occurs after the damage caused by the initial impact to the skull, according to doctors. Medical professionals classify it into two types: extracranial and intracranial.

Extracranial secondary brain damage cause problems either by restricting the flow of oxygen to the brain or restricting the flow of blood. Both of these conditions can eventually cause the death of brain cells. This can be extremely dangerous, especially if undetected for a time.

The most extreme consequence of oxygen deprivation is the persistent vegetative state (PVS) or death. Secondary brain damage due to lack of oxygen or low blood pressure can even occure to those who have already been admitted to intensive care units, according to studiess. Some studies have shown this can occur in about a third of patients, even when such an injury was not detected earlier.

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When Lee Woodruff found out that her husband, ABC News Anchor Bob Woodruff, was severely injured while embedded with the military in Iraq, a roller coaster 5-year-long recovery began it’s sometimes ugly ascent.

The newsman suffered a TBI (Traumatic Brain Injury) when an explosive device detonated near a tank he was in.

According to a medic following the case, “When the bomb exploded, hundreds of pieces of rock and shrapnel embedded into Bob’s face, neck, and back.” Subsequently, his skull was shattered.

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Explosive blast traumatic brain injury(bTBI) can be a complicated thing, doctors have learned. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have determined secondary, tertiary, and even quaternary effects that may contribute to a particular patient’s condition.

The primary injury comes from the forces created by the explosion itself. Secondary injury might occur due to matter thrown by the explosion, like fragments from the weapon itself, or debris in the immediate environment. Tertiary injury like skull fractures occur when the victim is thrown by the blast to strike a wall or the ground. Finally, quaternary injuries may occur from factors not included in the first three, like burns or inhalation of toxic fumes.

Doctors have seen that the injuries can cause a number of symptoms. It might be as mild as a brief period of confusion – or it may lead to a coma. Severe bTBI commonly leads to diffuse cerebral edema and hyperemia, developing rapidly, within an hour after the initial blast injury. This type of injury seems to be much more common with blasts, as opposed to other forms of traumatic brain injury, and this type of injury has lead to military neurosurgeons performing more decompressive craniectomies more often than they would for penetrative traumatic brain injury (pTBI) or closed head traumatic brain injury (cTBI).

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Studies indicated that a man who received a brain injury when he was caught by police while he broke into the home of a business man did not get the jail sentence that many thought that he deserved for another offence that he committed. This decision was made due to his brain injury and because he was not fit to enter a plea.

According to the police, the defendant was hit with a bat by the business man during the incident that took place. The brain injury that he sustained caused him to escape from being imprisoned. The defendant was facing other charges, but the jury decided that he could not be found guilty.

A court spokesperson said, “He received a reduced penalty of being supervised for twelve months in a probation program.” The business man was put in jail for injuring the defendant according to authorities, but he was later released after his appeal. He had chased the defendant down the street and inflicted a skull fracture on him. According to the judge, no one was in any danger after the defendant had left the business man’s home; therefore, the business man should be made liable for his actions.

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The way surgeons deal with shrapnel or bone fragments in the brain has changed since the days of Korea or Vietnam, doctors tell New York Brain Injury Lawyers. It was once the standard to remove every last fragment of bone or any other foreign body, so the brain would have a lower risk of infection and there would be less chance of developing post-traumatic epilepsy or skull fracture. Studies of Vietnam War patients in The Bronx and Brooklyn have shown that removal of all fragments is not actually necessary, though objects that cause gross contamination should still be removed.

Closure of the scalp and replacement of the dura are absolutely vital to prevent, or at least reduce the chance of, CSF leakage and meningitis. A soldier who seems to have good neurological status, with only small fragments in the brain may be able to be treated locally to prevent leakage. One with a more extensive injury will have to undergo a large decompressive creniectomy and removal of the fragments, NY Brain Injury Lawyers have learned.

Another source of head injury from an explosive blast can result from being bodily thrown by the explosion. The soldier’s head could strike some other object, causing tertiary blast injury. This can cause injuries in a number of places in the patient’s skull. There is also the risk of infection in cases such as these, often from bacteria that are drug-resistant. A number of dangerous injuries can result from such trauma. It can be very important to repair such injuries as facial fractures quickly.

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According to a doctor, a woman sustained a very serious brain injury after a car driven by some jewelry thieves dragged her. The robbers were trying to steal her diamond bracelet. The defense lawyer made an argument that it was the woman who caused the outcome.

The Nassau doctor indicated that it was the thieves that went to the woman’s home to steal her diamond bracelet that she had put up for sale on a website. Apparently, the thieves had seen the advertisement and had gone to recover the item without paying.

The woman chased the thieves to the car and put up a fight to get her precious jewelry back. The source said that one of the teenage robbers became fearful and then drove off quickly without paying attention to the struggle that was taking place with the passenger and the woman.

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Last Monday, a Mebane woman pleaded guilty to slamming the head of a toddler against a wall. She was babysitting the boy; her actions may have caused life-long brain damage.

The 23-year-old resident of Norris Mobile Home Park pleaded guilty to the December 11th charge of felony child abuse inflicting serious injury. A New York Criminal Attorney reports that investigators believe she became angry or impatient with the 2-year-old boy and pushed him hard into a kitchen wall, which fractured his skull, leaving him with brain swelling and hemorrhaging eyes.

The Superior Court judge presiding over the case, took statements from the accused and her father, as well as the toddler’s family. The judge sentenced the 23-year-old to 59-80 months in prison. He reported that decision would not guarantee the health of the boy who was harmed.

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