Articles Posted in Traumatic Brain Damage

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Authorities in Long Island have studied a publication by the World Health Organization (WHO) called the International Classification of Diseases (ICD). In this publication, trauma and head injury are included in the chapter ‘Injury and Poisoning’. Before 1950, trauma was classified by the external cause, which makes it impossible to collect data regarding only injuries to the head. The fifth version, ICD-5, added a classification based on the nature and diagnosis of the injury.

Still, all brain injuries were classified as ‘Intracranial injury without skull fracture’, which included hematomas of the scalp – not necessarily a brain injury. This focused on such problems as skull fractures, rather than impacts that might damage the brain without causing significant damage to the skull itself.

The ninth edition, ICD-9-CM, provided a three-digit code system for major diagnostics, such as 800 meaning skull fractures. An additional digit, such a 800.1 – Closed head injury with cerebral laceration and contusion; 800.2 – Closed head injury with subarachnoid, subdural, and extradural hemorrhage, serve to further classify injuries and diseases. The CM stands for Clinical Modification, which could add yet another digit, to provide further definition.

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The symptoms of bTBI (explosive blast traumatic brain injury) can actually be very subtle, doctors tell studies. Sometimes, there is no outward sign of injury until certain symptoms begin to arise, like headaches, vertigo, or short-term memory loss. Because of this, victims of bTBI should be evaluated by a physician or psychologist to determine how extensive their injuries might be, if any. Neurophysical evaluation should be a part of this examination. There are currently efforts to create neuropsychological tests that can be automated on laptop computer or are easy enough to be used to by first responders who may have less training.

Patient who may have PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) should see a combat stress team provider or a psychiatrist as soon as possible. It is very important to remember, doctors have learned, that bTBI and PTSD can have very similar symptoms and may occur alone or together in a patient. It may be difficult to tell them apart.

When TBI may be present in a patient, that person should be excused from all combat-related duties. The patient should be put on light duty until the symptoms are gone or until he or she is moved to a place where advanced neuroimaging, like MRI, may be used, and a more detailed evaluation can be used. Doctors in Bronx and Queens hospitals have determined that it is vital for a patient suffering TBI, or who may be suffering from it, to be treated with the utmost care, so the condition does not become worse.

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A child left seriously injured by medical mistakes made at his birth is to receive £4.6 million in compensation, a source reports.

The boy, who was born at Queen Elizabeth Hospital in King’s Lynn in June 2004, suffered severe injuries at the hands of medical personnel attending his mother’s labor. Apparently, during the delivery, the medical staff allegedly mistook his mother’s heartbeat for his. Because to this, they did not notice that the baby had an abnormal heartbeat. This resulted in delays in his delivery.

During the delay, the boy’s heart stopped beating, and he suffered oxygen starvation to the brain. This always leads to serious brain injury, a source states.

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Doctors have learned of a new classification for traumatic brain injury (TBI), known as explosive blast traumatic brain injury (bTBI). Previously, physicians divided TBI into two categories, penetrating traumatic brain injury (pTBI) and closed head traumatic brain injury (cTBI). Blast TBI is similar, but has some aspects that are all its own.

Penetrative TBI involves the penetration of a foreign object through the bones of the skull and into the brain parenchyma. This physically disrupts neurons, glia, and fiber tracts, which is made worse by ischemia and hemorrhage. Victims of this type of injury show signs of impaired consciousness and neurological difficulties associated with the parenchyma injured by the intrusion of the foreign object. An object penetrating at high velocity, like a bullet, will cause a great deal more damage, due to cavitation of brain tissue. There will be a breach in the skull where the object entered, and possibly another at the point of exit. pTBI is often easy to spot.

Closed head traumatic brain injury is sometimes more difficult to spot. The brain moving inside the skull and deformation of the brain can cause injury to the brain parenchyma, blood vessels, and fiber tracts.

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The symptoms of bTBI (explosive blast traumatic brain injury) can actually be very subtle, doctors tell sources. Sometimes, there is no outward sign of injury until certain symptoms begin to arise, like headaches, vertigo, or short-term memory loss. Because of this, victims of bTBI should be evaluated by a physician or psychologist to determine how extensive their injuries might be, if any. Neurophysical evaluation should be a part of this examination. There are currently efforts to create neuropsychological tests that can be automated on laptop computer or are easy enough to be used to by first responders who may have less training.

Patient who may have PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder) should see a combat stress team provider or a psychiatrist as soon as possible. It is very important to remember, doctors have learned, that bTBI and PTSD can have very similar symptoms and may occur alone or together in a patient. It may be difficult to tell them apart.

When TBI may be present in a patient, that person should be excused from all combat-related duties. The patient should be put on light duty until the symptoms are gone or until he or she is moved to a place where advanced neuroimaging, like MRI, may be used, and a more detailed evaluation can be used. Lawyers in Staten Island and Westchester have determined that it is vital for a patient suffering TBI, or who may be suffering from it, to be treated with the utmost care, so the condition does not become worse.

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Explosive blast traumatic brain injury(bTBI) can be a complicated thing, sources have learned. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention have determined secondary, tertiary, and even quaternary effects that may contribute to a particular patient’s condition.

The primary injury comes from the forces created by the explosion itself. Secondary injury might occur due to matter thrown by the explosion, like fragments from the weapon itself, or debris in the immediate environment. Tertiary injury occurs when the victim is thrown by the blast to strike a wall or the ground. Finally, quaternary injuries may occur from factors not included in the first three, like burns or inhalation of toxic fumes.

Doctors have seen that the injuries can cause a number of symptoms. It might be as mild as a brief period of confusion – or it may lead to a coma. Severe bTBI commonly leads to diffuse cerebral edema and hyperemia, developing rapidly, within an hour after the initial blast injury. This type of injury seems to be much more common with blasts, as opposed to other forms of traumatic brain injury, and this type of injury has lead to military neurosurgeons performing more decompressive craniectomies more often than they would for penetrative traumatic brain injury (pTBI) or closed head traumatic brain injury (cTBI).

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Blast TBI (traumatic brain injury) happens to many combatants, according to a study. It can rightfully be considered a new class of TBI. While it might share a lot of features with standard TBI, it has some unique aspects that are all its own.

The milder forms of TBI can be very similar to PTSD (post-traumatic stress disorder), but it also has distinct aspects of its own. The military currently uses civilian standards of care for TBI when it comes to bTBI (explosive blast TBI), but they are constantly revising their standards to better provide for those injured on the field, according to sources. The theater of war requires different standards of medical practice.

It is apparent that there need to be more studies done on the precise effects of bTBI, both scientifically and clinically. The research will have to be focused upon how explosive blasts can lead to TBI. It is also important to learn how prevalent this disease is, and the exact causes. Once the research reaches a certain level, it will become much easier to diagnose and treat bTBI. A clinical definition of bTBI should quickly create the means to treat bTBI.

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Lawyers have learned of a new classification for traumatic brain injury (TBI), known as explosive blast traumatic brain injury (bTBI). Previously, physicians divided TBI into two categories, penetrating traumatic brain injury (pTBI) and closed head traumatic brain injury (cTBI). Blast TBI is similar, but has some aspects that are all its own.

Penetrative TBI involves the penetration of a foreign object through the bones of the skull and into the brain parenchyma. This physically disrupts neurons, glia, and fiber tracts, which is made worse by ischemia and hemorrhage. Victims of this type of injury show signs of impaired consciousness and neurological difficulties associated with the parenchyma injured by the intrusion of the foreign object. An object penetrating at high velocity, like a bullet, will cause a great deal more damage, due to cavitation of brain tissue. There will be a breach in the skull where the object entered, and possibly another at the point of exit. pTBI is often easy to spot.

Closed head traumatic brain injury, is sometimes more difficult to spot. The brain moving inside the skull and deformation of the brain can cause injury to the brain parenchyma, blood vessels, and fiber tracts.

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The Wounded Warrior Project is looking forward to the introduction and passage of a new bill that would help warriors suffering severe traumatic brain injury live better lives after their sacrifices in Iraq and Afghanistan, describes a doctor.

The bill, called The Veterans’ Traumatic Brain Injury Rehabilitative Services’ Improvement Act of 2011, would make it mandatory for the VA to give veterans with severe traumatic brain injury ongoing long-term care with the hope of future rehabilitation. This would include support services that emphasize personal independence and a better quality of life for the patient.

“This important bipartisan, bi-cameral legislation would close critical gaps in VA rehabilitation programs for warriors who have suffered severe traumatic brain injury,” the executive director of the Wounded Warrior Project told reporters. “These complex injuries often require long-term rehabilitative care. The legislation would help ensure that needed rehabilitation is not prematurely cut off, and that these veterans can get the supports they need – whether those are health-services or non-medical assistance – to achieve maximum independence and quality of life.”

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The human brain has an amazing capacity to heal itself. Every year, about 1.7 million people suffer a traumatic brain injury (TBI) in the U.S. Like so many other victims of TBI, U.S. Representative Giffords is reportedly making remarkable progress.

Last January, an attacker shot Representative Gabby Giffords at point blank range. The bullet shot through her brain, wreaking havoc.

Just last week, she was seen walking up the stairs of an airplane. It took quite a bit of effort an she had assistants available to help her if she needed it. The Representative’s ordeal is the perfect showcase for brain plasticity – the brain’s amazing capability to restore some functions after major brain injury. Proper rehabilitation helps this process of the brain’s.

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